Working Holiday permit to Canada: Travelling as a couple and/or with kids

Chapter 1: Introduction

Published: 06-03-2020

Author

Julie

Working Holiday permit to Canada – Travelling as a couple and travelling with kids

Tackling the Working Holiday permit adventure in Canada with your significant other and/or with kids? Read on, this article will answer all your questions!

But first things first, there’s one important rule to know. All travellers to Canada must have their own passport and immigration status. This means that:

  • There’s no “fiancé visa ” or “get one Working Holiday permit, bring five kids for free.”
  • An “immigration status” can be “visitor,” “permanent resident,” “work permit holder,” “study permit holder,” etc.
  • Your significant other and/or kids cannot be “included” in your own Working Holiday permit application.

Most of the time, partners and spouses apply for their own Working Holiday permit and there are several options if their profile isn’t drawn (read Chapter 2 for more info). Young children usually enter Canada as “visitors” (you may need to apply for a visitor visa) and are allowed to stay until your Working Holiday permit expires. Older children may need a study permit, apply for it before going to Canada (for more info, read Chapter 3).

Pro tip to complete form IMM5707 – Family Information

If your profile is drawn from the pool, you will receive an Invitation to apply. The next step will be accepting it and submitting your application for a Working Holiday permit to Canada. As part of your application, you will have to complete form Imm5707 – Family Information.

You must answer “yes” or “no” to the question “Accompanying you to Canada?” for each family member you list (spouse, common-law partner, kid[s]).

How should you answer this question?

  • If your spouse or common-law partner will not travel to Canada with you, answer “no.”
  • If your kid(s) will not travel to Canada with you, answer “no.”
  • If your spouse or common-law partner and/or kid(s) will travel to Canada with you, answer “yes.”

Keep in mind that answering “yes” isn’t a shortcut for your spouse, common-law partner and/or kid(s) to get a work permit. As explained above, “one person, one application” and every traveller to Canada must have their own immigration status.

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